Noserings, Tuxedos, Mohawks: The Dos and Don’ts of Interviewing

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Congratulations, you’ve got an interview!

So how do you ace it and not fall flat?

Don’t screw up this all-important conversation! Our Twitter #careerchat talked about what you should wear, when to discuss salary, and all the preparation and research that goes into making a great first and lasting impression.

Remember…

  • bizMebizgal: Interviewing is like networking: The more you do it, the easier it becomes.
  • Jelfster: Job interviews needn’t be torture. Just plan well and use common sense!

This way to the chat transcript

Networking With Confidence: How to Break the Ice Without Falling Through

When you’re walking into a networking event, you want to be sure you’re putting your best foot—and face!—forward. If you’re desperately shy or the room is full of strangers, how can you overcome those conversational jitters and make the impression you want? 

Our Twitter #careerchat found great networking tips to help even the most introverted. Debbie Langford (@LangfordDeb), a Right Management career consultant, added her considerable guidance and navigation.

Key takeaways from the chat:

  • The first icebreaker is your smile.
  • Networking is like sales: First build the relationship, then find out their needs, and then sell yourself as the solution.
  • Provide value to others before you ask for help. Switch your thinking from “What do I get?” to “What can I give?”
  • Research event attendees beforehand so you’ll know who’s in the room and what their accomplishments are.
  • Sign up as a door greeter or check registration at the event to meet people more easily.
  • To network your way to a job, identify the decision-making contacts and set up informal interview sessions to present your value.
  • Don’t forget the people you work with. Network through vendor contacts, clients and co-workers to stir up offers in related fields.
  • Discipline yourself to keep networking. It’s easy to get to a “comfortable place” and think you’re done.

Resources:

Special thanks to… @theantiresume, @jendiva1, @KCDEE5, @hfazlani, @rockthehunt, @jackiej04, @ComeRecommended, @SuzanneLahaije, @Careerbright, @michmerc, @SeanMMasters, @CareerAction,  @CondeNastJobs, @SaleStart, @jessieolivia, @Recruit4u, @PushJobs, @norateele and @MaggieMistal.

Job seeker? Just want to get ahead in your career?

Join our Twitter #careerchat Tuesdays @ 12 PM CT to talk about everything from friending your boss on Facebook to personal branding to how to get a call back from recruiter.

How to join: Go to Tweetchat.com and follow the hashtag “careerchat” at noon CT every Tuesday!

Adapted from my post on MyPath.com.
Networking pic from here.

Professional Communities & Your Personal Brand: Making You, Inc., Shine

Are you making the most of your online reputation?

I don’t mean just maintaining a positive, employer-friendly presence on LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. You want to make sure you’re saying loud and clear just how valuable you are.

But how do you get the point across without making it seem that you’re all about me, me, me?

One great way to demonstrate your expertise: Joining an industry-focused online community. You not only expand your own professional network, but by helping others through their concerns, you’re showing the knowledge that employers are looking for.

George Krautzel (@GeorgeKrautzel), president and CEO of Toolbox.com, joined us for a Twitter #careerchat about best-practice professional communities.

Key takeaways from the chat:

  • Niche communities in your industry let you showcase your knowledge and networking with your peers. Through your contributions, you build your reputation within your area of expertise.
  • When you join a group, look for ways to engage with others. Take time to learn the style, tone and level of expertise. Answer a question, share experiences, solve problems, and collaborate on topics where you have expertise.
  • Be genuine, helpful, respectful and open-minded. The rules of engagement don’t change just because you’re online. Treat people as if you are in person.
  • Even if you joined to get leads for a new position, move beyond “job” and think “career.” Participate to acquire knowledge, help others, benchmark yourself against peers, and build a network.
  • Position yourself properly: Have a strong, clear and accurate representation of your personal brand and value proposition. For recruiters, the big benefit of utilizing best practice communities is to source candidates they can more easily validate.

Resources:

Special thanks to @laurenkgray, @PaigeHolden, @JohnAntonios, @WriterChanelle, @myFootpath, @SaleStart, @socialskipper, @ASQ_Trish, @michmerc, @kbaumann, @ManpowerProUS, @Beamena, @CareerAction, @manpowerus, @olivia67rae, @THO_R, @PushJobs, @talentdiva and @MaggieMistal.

Job seeker? Just want to get ahead in your career?

Join our Twitter #careerchat Tuesdays @ 12 PM CT to talk about everything from friending your boss on Facebook to personal branding to how to get a call back from recruiter.

How to join: Go to Tweetchat.com and follow the hashtag “careerchat” at noon CT every Tuesday!

Adapted from my post on MyPath.
Image taken from here.